Monthly Archives: September 2015

Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

Laparoscopic Surgery

Laparoscopy is commonly performed procedure to Investigate and some key whole surgeries on abdominal and pelvic organs.

Laparoscopy is direct visualization of the abdominal cavity and intra-abdominal organs by using a laparoscopy. The laparoscope is a long thin instrument with a light source at its tip, to light up the inside of the abdomen or pelvis. Fibreoptic fibres carry images from a lens, also at the tip of the instrument, to a video monitor, which the surgeon and other theatre staff can view in real time.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is put into the abdomen through a special needle that is inserted just above the navel. This gas helps to separate the organs inside the abdominal cavity, making it easier for the physician to see the intra-abdominal organs during laparoscopy. The gas is removed at the end of the procedure.

Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding

In Adjustable gastric banding procedure, a hollow band made of special material is placed around the stomach near its upper end, creating a small pouch and a narrow passage into the larger remainder of the stomach. The band is then inflated with a salt solution. It can be tightened or loosened over time to change the size of the passage by increasing or decreasing the amount of salt solution.

Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

Sleeve Gastrectomy (Tube Gastrectomy) procedure involves removing the lateral 2/3rds of the stomach with a stapling device. It can be done laparoscopically (keyhole surgery) but is not reversible. It basically leaves a stomach tube instead of a stomach sack.

Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass

In Gastric Bypass procedure, a small stomach pouch is created to restrict food intake. Next, a Y-shaped section of the small intestine is attached to the pouch to allow food to bypass the lower stomach, the duodenum (the first segment of the small intestine), and the first portion of the jejunum (the second segment of the small intestine). This bypass reduces the absorption of nutrients and thereby reduces the calorie intake.

Dr Eslami is an active member of the medical staff at several Mercy Hospitals. He has obtained Board Certification in Surgery from the American Board of Surgery. He is a member of the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES). Dr Eslami is designated as a Center of Excellence- Bariatric Surgeon through the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) of which he is an active member. Dr. Eslami is an avid runner, biker, and swimmer. He enjoys boating, spending time with friends and family, participating in cultural meetings, and reading history in his spare time.

Obesity surgery California

Dr. Eslami earned his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Tehran in Iran. Upon graduation, Dr. Eslami completed two years of service in the military as a general practitioner. In 1999 he relocated to the United States and completed a residency program in General Surgery at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, and was awarded a chief residency completion in both surgical trauma and intensive care shock trauma. He then went on to the Baylor College of Medicine in Texas to complete his fellowship in Advanced Minimally Invasive and Bariatric Surgery.

In addition to his formal education, Dr. Eslami has been very involved with clinical research, and often presents his articles at various conferences around the country.

Dr Eslami is an active member of the medical staff at several Mercy Hospitals. He has obtained Board Certification in Surgery from the American Board of Surgery. He is a member of the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES). Dr Eslami is designated as a Center of Excellence- Bariatric Surgeon through the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) of which he is an active member. Dr. Eslami is an avid runner, biker, and swimmer. He enjoys boating, spending time with friends and family, participating in cultural meetings, and reading history in his spare time.

What is Obesity?

Obesity results from the excess accumulation of fat that exceeds the body’s skeletal and physical standards. According to the American Obesity Association, Obesity is a disease.

Slim Life Solutions – Check of the treatment such as Obesity surgery, lapband surgery and laparoscopic surgery.

What is Morbid Obesity?

Morbid Obesity is typically defined as being 100 lbs. or more over ideal body weight, or having a BMI (Body Mass Index) of 40 or higher. Morbid Obesity reaches a point of significantly increasing the risk of co-Morbidities that result in either significant physical disability or even death. Morbid Obesity is a serious and chronic disease. Treatment is available, and surgery is an extremely viable option for you.

What is the cost of this operation?

Please contact us and take care to fill out the insurance coverage verification portion of the form.

Will my insurance cover this operation?

Most health insurance companies will cover most of this surgical procedure. However, there are so many plans that it is best to contact us and to schedule an appointment.

How safe is this operation?

Like every operation, there is a risk. Because our patients already have health-related problems, there is an increased risk of complications. However, our team makes sure the thoroughly screen you to make sure that there are no surprises on the operating table. If we feel that it is not safe to operate on you, we will not proceed. However we will gladly work with you in order for you to be eligible for the operation. Your team will be behind you 100% before, during, and after the surgery.

Weeks leading up to surgery

 Alcohol

1. Alcohol causes gastric irritation and can cause liver damage. During periods of rapid weight loss the liver becomes especially vulnerable to toxins such as alcohol. You may find that only a couple of sips of wine can give you unusually quick and strong effects of alcohol intolerance.

2. In addition, alcoholic beverages are high in empty calories and may cause “dumping syndrome.”

3. For these reasons, we recommend complete abstinence from alcohol for one year after surgery and avoiding frequent consumption thereafter.

Work and Disability

a. Typically, bariatric surgery patients can expect to return to work in about two to four weeks, however this can vary from person to person. This may vary greatly. The time you take from works depends on many things, including the kind of work you do, your general state of health, how badly your work needs you, how badly you need you need your work (i.e. the money), your general state of motivation, the surgical approach (laparoscopic vs. open) and your energy level.

Slim Life Solutions – Check of the Gastric bypass California  treatment such as Weight loss California, lapband surgery and laparoscopic surgery.

b. It is important to remember that you are not just recovering from surgery, but you are eating very little and losing weight rapidly. We caution you to not rush back to full-time work too quickly. The first few weeks are a precious time to get to know your new digestive system, to rest, exercise and meet with other post-operative patients in support group meetings.  If financially feasible, take this time to focus on your recovery.

c. You may not wish to tell the people you work with what kind of surgery you are having. It is perfectly appropriate to tell as much or as little to your employer as you would like. Although you do not need to tell your employer that you are having weight loss surgery, it is recommended to reveal that you are having major abdominal surgery.  Explain that you need two or more weeks to recover, especially if you would like to have some form of financial compensation during your absence.

d. Your employer should have the relevant forms for you to complete. You may want to indicate that you will not be able to do any heavy lifting for several months after surgery.

The Day Before

  1. Bowel Preparation before Surgery

a. You will be given instructions for bowel preparation at your pre-operative appointment. It is important that you follow these instructions completely.

b. The day before surgery, you may drink only clear liquids. Clear liquids include water, coffee, tea, apple juice, grape juice, cranberry juice, bouillon, broth, clear popsicles, clear soda and gelatine.

c. After midnight the day before your surgery, you must take nothing by mouth except medicines that have been approved by the anaesthesiologist and surgeon. Your stomach must be empty at the start of the procedure to reduce the risk of aspiration.

If You is ill Before Surgery

a. Should you develop a cold, persistent cough, fever, skin breakdown or any changes in your condition during the days before your surgery, please notify the surgeon immediately, as you will need to be re-evaluated for surgical readiness. You need to be in the best possible shape for anaesthesia. Scheduling can be adjusted to your condition, if necessary.